Immunity and Pathogenesis Program

lymph node with abscess; image from NIH Image Gallery

Disease and the immune response

Pathogenesis—literally how disease (pathos) begins (genesis) or develops—is a broad and important area of research.

Many diseases can arise from pathogens, but the immune system protects us through various lines of defense. If the immune system fails to function properly and becomes too weak or too strong, it can lead to disease states that include immunodeficiencies that lead to enhanced susceptibly to infections disease, autoimmune conditions, such as lupus and arthritis, and even cancer. 

Director's statement

Our focus is on understanding the regulation and interplay of host immune responses and microbial pathogenesis. We study viral-host interactions, innate and humoral immunity, inflammation and T cell checkpoint regulation. A better understanding of these aspects of the immune system will provide novel therapeutic opportunities to address many unmet medical needs, including the treatment of endemic and pandemic infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, cancer and inflammatory diseases.

Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., Program Director

Appointments

Publications

Cutting Edge: The RNA-Binding Protein Ewing Sarcoma Is a Novel Modulator of Lymphotoxin β Receptor Signaling.

Virgen-Slane R, Correa RG, Ramezani-Rad P, Steen-Fuentes S, Detanico T, DiCandido MJ, Li J, Ware CF

J Immunol 2020 Mar 1 ;204(5):1085-1090

Identifying determinants of bacterial fitness in a model of human gut microbial succession.

Feng L, Raman AS, Hibberd MC, Cheng J, Griffin NW, Peng Y, Leyn SA, Rodionov DA, Osterman AL, Gordon JI

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2020 Feb 4 ;117(5):2622-2633