Charles Spruck, Ph.D.

Charles Spruck's Research Focus

Breast Cancer

Dr. Spruck’s laboratory is focused on defining the molecular networks that regulate cell division control and how alteration of these processes contributes to cancer development and metastasis. Emphases of the laboratory include 1) protein degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis pathway, 2) breast cancer metastasis, and 3) identifying novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. The laboratory utilizes biochemical approaches as well as in vitro and animal model systems. Current projects in the laboratory include: 1) functional screens of ubiquitin ligases to identify novel cancer drug targets; 2) defining the molecular regulation of breast cancer metastasis to the brain; and 3) understanding signaling pathways that influence the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy.

Charles Spruck's Bio

Charles Spruck earned his B.S. in biology from the University of California Los Angeles and Ph.D. in molecular biology at the University of Southern California in 1995. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla and was recruited to the Sidney J. Kimmel Cancer Center in San Diego as an Assistant Professor in 2003. He joined SBP in 2010.

He’s been a Fellow in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America and a Scholar of the American Cancer Society.


TIM Accessory

Publications

Cks overexpression enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy by overriding DNA damage checkpoints.

del Rincón SV, Widschwendter M, Sun D, Ekholm-Reed S, Tat J, Teixeira LK, Ellederova Z, Grolieres E, Reed SI, Spruck C

Oncogene 2015 Apr 9 ;34(15):1961-7

Phosphorylation of eIF4E promotes EMT and metastasis via translational control of SNAIL and MMP-3.

Robichaud N, del Rincon SV, Huor B, Alain T, Petruccelli LA, Hearnden J, Goncalves C, Grotegut S, Spruck CH, Furic L, Larsson O, Muller WJ, Miller WH, Sonenberg N

Oncogene 2015 Apr 16 ;34(16):2032-42

Development and validation of a method for profiling post-translational modification activities using protein microarrays.

Del Rincón SV, Rogers J, Widschwendter M, Sun D, Sieburg HB, Spruck C

PLoS One 2010 Jun 28 ;5(6):e11332

Phosphorylation of eIF4E promotes EMT and metastasis via translational control of SNAIL and MMP-3.

Robichaud N, del Rincon SV, Huor B, Alain T, Petruccelli LA, Hearnden J, Goncalves C, Grotegut S, Spruck CH, Furic L, Larsson O, Muller WJ, Miller WH, Sonenberg N

Oncogene 2015 Apr 16 ;34(16):2032-42

Cyclin-dependent kinase subunit (Cks) 1 or Cks2 overexpression overrides the DNA damage response barrier triggered by activated oncoproteins.

Liberal V, Martinsson-Ahlzén HS, Liberal J, Spruck CH, Widschwendter M, McGowan CH, Reed SI

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Feb 21 ;109(8):2754-9

Cyclin-dependent kinase-associated proteins Cks1 and Cks2 are essential during early embryogenesis and for cell cycle progression in somatic cells.

Martinsson-Ahlzén HS, Liberal V, Grünenfelder B, Chaves SR, Spruck CH, Reed SI

Mol Cell Biol 2008 Sep ;28(18):5698-709

Cyclin E dysregulation and chromosomal instability in endometrial cancer.

Hubalek MM, Widschwendter A, Erdel M, Gschwendtner A, Fiegl HM, Müller HM, Goebel G, Mueller-Holzner E, Marth C, Spruck CH, Reed SI, Widschwendter M

Oncogene 2004 May 20 ;23(23):4187-92

Mutation of hCDC4 leads to cell cycle deregulation of cyclin E in cancer.

Ekholm-Reed S, Spruck CH, Sangfelt O, van Drogen F, Mueller-Holzner E, Widschwendter M, Zetterberg A, Reed SI

Cancer Res 2004 Feb 1 ;64(3):795-800

Requirement of Cks2 for the first metaphase/anaphase transition of mammalian meiosis.

Spruck CH, de Miguel MP, Smith AP, Ryan A, Stein P, Schultz RM, Lincoln AJ, Donovan PJ, Reed SI

Science 2003 Apr 25 ;300(5619):647-50

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