Evan Snyder, M.D., Ph.D.

Evan Snyder's Research Focus

Cancer, Brain Cancer, Breast Cancer, Skin Cancer and Melanoma, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Arthritis, Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, Muscular Dystrophy, Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Diseases, Alzheimer's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's Disease), HIV-Associated Dementia, Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, Traumatic Injury, Spinal Cord Injury, Brain Injury, Childhood Diseases, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

We believe the study of stem cell biology will provide insights into many areas: developmental biology, homeostasis in the normal adult, and recovery from injury. Indeed, past and current research has already produced data in these areas that would have been difficult or impossible via any other vehicle. We have engaged in a multidisciplinary approach, simultaneously exploring the basic biology of stem cells, their role throughout the lifetime of an individual, as well as their therapeutic potential. Taken together, these bodies of knowledge will glean the greatest benefit for scientists and, most importantly, for patients. All of our research to date has been preformed in animal models with the ultimate goal of bringing them to clinical trials as soon as possible. Stem cells offer an intriguing mix of controversy, discovery, and hope. Politicians are charged with dealing with the controversial facets of stem cells, as we prefer to focus our energy on their potential for discovery and hope. 

The Snyder Lab studies stem cell biology, with the goal of understanding normal development, tissue homeostasis, and recovery from injury and disease. A major focus is neural stem cells (NSCs), which can self-renew and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. These properties make NSCs ideal for repair of damage due to injury or disease, but they also make them susceptible to transformation into malignant cancers.

Evan Snyder's Bio

Evan Y. Snyder earned his M.D. and Ph.D. (in neuroscience) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1980 as a member of NIH's Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). He had also studied psychology and linguistics at the University of Oxford. After moving to Boston in 1980, he completed residencies in pediatrics and neurology as well as a clinical fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Children's Hospital-Boston, Harvard Medical School. He also served as Chief Resident in Medicine (1984-1985) and Chief Resident in Neurology (1987) at Children's Hospital-Boston. In 1989, he became an attending physician in the Department of Pediatrics (Division of Newborn Medicine) and Department of Neurology at Children's Hospital-Boston, Harvard Medical School. From 1985-1991, concurrent with his clinical activities, he conducted postdoctoral research as a fellow in the Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School. In 1992, Dr. Snyder was appointed an instructor in neurology (neonatology) at Harvard Medical School and was promoted to assistant professor in 1996. He maintained lab spaces in both Children's Hospital-Boston and at Harvard Institutes of Medicine/Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2003, Dr. Snyder was recruited to Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute as Professor and Director of the Program in Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology. He then inaugurated the Stem Cell Research Center (serving as its founding director) and initiated the Southern California Stem Cell Consortium. Dr. Snyder is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FAAP). He also received training in Philosophy and Linguistics at Oxford University.


Human Genetics Accessory

Publications

Probing the lithium-response pathway in hiPSCs implicates the phosphoregulatory set-point for a cytoskeletal modulator in bipolar pathogenesis.

Tobe BTD, Crain AM, Winquist AM, Calabrese B, Makihara H, Zhao WN, Lalonde J, Nakamura H, Konopaske G, Sidor M, Pernia CD, Yamashita N, Wada M, Inoue Y, Nakamura F, Sheridan SD, Logan RW, Brandel M, Wu D, Hunsberger J, Dorsett L, Duerr C, Basa RCB, McCarthy MJ, Udeshi ND, Mertins P, Carr SA, Rouleau GA, Mastrangelo L, Li J, Gutierrez GJ, Brill LM, Venizelos N, Chen G, Nye JS, Manji H, Price JH, McClung CA, Akiskal HS, Alda M, Chuang DM, Coyle JT, Liu Y, Teng YD, Ohshima T, Mikoshiba K, Sidman RL, Halpain S, Haggarty SJ, Goshima Y, Snyder EY

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 May 30 ;114(22):E4462-E4471

Proof of concept studies exploring the safety and functional activity of human parthenogenetic-derived neural stem cells for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Gonzalez R, Garitaonandia I, Crain A, Poustovoitov M, Abramihina T, Noskov A, Jiang C, Morey R, Laurent LC, Elsworth JD, Snyder EY, Redmond DE Jr, Semechkin R

Cell Transplant 2015 ;24(4):681-90

Neural stem cells implanted into MPTP-treated monkeys increase the size of endogenous tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells found in the striatum: a return to control measures.

Bjugstad KB, Redmond DE Jr, Teng YD, Elsworth JD, Roth RH, Blanchard BC, Snyder EY, Sladek JR Jr

Cell Transplant 2005 ;14(4):183-92

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Driving Neuronal Differentiation through Reversal of an ERK1/2-miR-124-SOX9 Axis Abrogates Glioblastoma Aggressiveness.

Sabelström H, Petri R, Shchors K, Jandial R, Schmidt C, Sacheva R, Masic S, Yuan E, Fenster T, Martinez M, Saxena S, Nicolaides TP, Ilkhanizadeh S, Berger MS, Snyder EY, Weiss WA, Jakobsson J, Persson AI

Cell Rep 2019 Aug 20 ;28(8):2064-2079.e11

Modeling Complex Neurological Diseases with Stem Cells: A Study of Bipolar Disorder.

Pernia CD, Nathan NH, Tobe BTD, Winquist AM, Sidman RL, Goshima Y, Snyder EY

Results Probl Cell Differ 2018 ;66:265-282

Novel Bivalent and D-Peptide Ligands of CXCR4 Mobilize Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells to the Blood in C3H/HeJ Mice.

Mao Y, Meng Q, Song P, Zhu S, Xu Y, Snyder EY, An J, Huang Z

Cell Transplant 2018 Aug ;27(8):1249-1255

Finding a new purpose for old drugs.

Snyder EY

Science 2017 Sep 1 ;357(6354):869-870

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